Need advice?

Leave a Comment

Thank you so much for taking the time to comment! Your email will not be published or shared, but you will receive an automatic email if your comment has a reply.

Comments

  1. February 5, 2018
    Jessie says

    Thank you for writing this… I lost my Mom a little over a year ago and the roller coaster of anxiety and deep depression has been horrendous. My family has a long genetic history of depression, so I kind of knew I would sink pretty low with the loss of her, but even with that foresight, it still knocks me on my ass every time. Most of the time I try to cover it up, or smile through it, feign happiness and excitement when all I want is to lay in a dark room and not talk to anyone or do anything. Trying to explain it to others often just made me feel guilty or worse (and having the constant sunny, happy California life around you at all times made it even worse as I craved cold, dark, rainy days to match my feelings). I find that seeking out others that understand or reading others tales about it helps immensely, makes me feel like less of a “freak” who can’t “get over things”. Hang in there, I’ll do the same, and I know we’ll both have many more moments of happiness in our North Bay sunny lives that will help get us through as well.

    Reply
  2. February 5, 2018
    Sandwich says

    This makes me want to give you a hug <3. Thank you for speaking out about depression. And thank you for helping end the stigma around mental health issues. With the help from influencers like you, I hope more people can open up and get the professional and social support they need.
    — A fellow human struggling with mental health issues.

    Reply
  3. February 6, 2018

    Yes, i love this. SOOOO many people just think im sad or upset about something when I’m actually have a bad depression day. More people need to read this.

    Reply
  4. February 7, 2018
    Laurel says

    This is spot on. Thank you. I don’t even understand my own depression and sometimes I feel so guilty about it that I think I’m faking it and that I’m lazy, that I’m negative and boring and don’t know how to have fun. I was listening to some TED talks literally this morning about depression and the relationship we have with ourselves and how it appears/effects our lives. One thing that stuck out to me was this “the opposite of depression is not happiness, but vitality”. That resonated with me. There isn’t a quick fix, but it’s important that people try to have compassion towards people who struggle, and maybe even more importantly…that we have compassion for ourselves. It is helpful to me to know that I am not alone in these feelings of frustration, guilt, and lack of motivation. Keep being an advocate for us! <3

    Reply
  5. February 7, 2018
    Kelly says

    Thank you for being so vulnerable and sharing this. There is such a stigma with mental illness which makes it very challenging to share with others. Your points about it not being the same as “feeling sad” and how people with depression cannot “just get over it” are spot on. I’ve struggled with depression for as long as I can remember and it takes a lot of work, self-care and forgiveness all day every day.

    Honestly it’s exhausting, but I’ve found that daily yoga and walks have been helpful and to try my best to push past the guilt and completely accept how I’m feeling on a given day. I even tell my husband “Today’s one of those days” and he’s learned to be sensitive to the fact that I just can’t do some things. Sending lots of love your way!

    Reply
  6. February 8, 2018

    I love this! I’ve been struggling with my own mental health this past two weeks and trying to explain to my partners that I’m not okay but I know I will be. It’s hard knowing they just want to help but they can’t rebalance the chemicals in my brain so they have to cuddle and wait it out, same as me.

    Reply
  7. February 9, 2018

    I love this! Thank you so much. There’s this conception that depression is all about sadness, but that’s not the entire picture. In my case, it has a lot to do with wondering what’s the point of anything, putting myself down a lot, and having absolutely no motivation to keep me going, which are all points you bring up.
    Depression is a huge damper on the spirits, and even though I’m working harder at being positive and loving myself, depression can be an inexplicable feeling I can’t quite shake off. It isn’t too hard for me to the point I dread waking up with all my being… more like a shadow that sort of follows me around while I live my “normal” life. Although…it makes me not want to go to bed because I don’t want to face a new day.

    Reply
  8. February 12, 2018
    Melina says

    Yes, Yes 100x yes. I relate to everything you said. You said it better than anyway that I could say it. I never have enough words to explain how depression really is. It’s so tough to explain it to others, especially those who have never experienced anything close to depression. I suffer from depression, and it sucks badly, especially because I get a lot of those comments like you do, and like you said, I don’t have a reason to feel the way I do, and it sucks. While hardships don’t make it easier and add onto the feelings you are having, it is not necessarily what drove you/me to feeling this way. Great post xxx

    Melina | http://www.ivefoundwaldo.com

    Reply
  9. February 14, 2018
    Kelly Shelley says

    Exactly. I have a wonderful life these days. I have some stressors but everyone does (and that has gotten easier to deal with in treatment. Last year I wanted to die. For about six months it was all I could think about. In April I tried…and was saved by my cat. In July I was going to go for it again but a friend convinced me to tell my psychiatrist what was going on (I had change doctors because as many folks do, I see a resident and they move on) and I spilled the beans about lying to fail the bipolar screen (despite my diagnosis twelve years ago) and about exactly how suicidal I really was…he had me hospitalized because I really was on the verge. My great life didn’t change how I felt or what I thought was the right thing to do. I thought I was an immense burden. I thought everyone would be better off without me. I thought life was not worth living.

    Three days as an inpatient, two weeks in a partial program, many med changes (including being put on a mood stabilizer and taken off my anti-depressant, and about seven months later, for the most part, I’m ok.

    Reply
  10. February 21, 2018

    Thank you for this post. I battle with depression myself, although was a slow build from the experiences I had in school. it’s so important to let people know that it isn’t just something you get over. I think depression only worsens when you don’t have a strong support group around you. I think in the US especially we try to “fix” people so that they’re more convenient for everyday life, but we’re all different, and we all struggle in some way or another. Those who suffer from mental illness like depression need compassion and grace just like everyone else. Telling someone to just “get over it” is not the answer. I’m really glad you’ve pointed these issues out. Great post! :)

    Devin

    http://www.motleyb.com

    Reply
  11. February 21, 2018
    Kailey says

    I love this blog. Its everything. Its perfection. Not sure where I should leave overall praise for this amazing blog but just thought ya’ll should know I love this article. And every other article on the site. Its all perfection, I love it. Ok thank you thats all!!!!

    Reply

need advice? ask amanda

Read previous post:
7 Airbnb Rentals for Your Next Ski Trip

Close